10 Life-changing Things to start doing in your 20s – Part 2

In Part 1 I outlined 10 tiny habits you could start picking up in your 20s; that could change the way you lead your life in the next few decades.

Here are the next 10.

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10 Life-changing Things to start doing in your 20s – Part 1

Are you currently in your 20s? The 20s can be a confusing time for many of us. It’s always when we have lots of things going on in our lives – college/getting an education work, starting a family, finding a life partner, purchasing your first house and so on. It’s also that time in our lives that we are discovering ourselves in a much deeper way and establishing our identities. 20s is also the time of youth. And like it or not, it’s usually dubbed the “golden era” of our lives and This will be the decade where you are at the prime of your life – the most energetic, the best looking, little responsibilities, and tons of opportunities at your feet.

So how then can we make the most of these 10 years? And not just that, what sorts of habits could we establish in our 20s that will set us on a good path for the rest of our lives? I outline some of my thoughts in these series of posts (more to come in the near future), gathering observations from strangers, friends and most of all, my own life.

Things to start doing in your 20s:

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The Best Celebrity College Commencement Speakers & Their Heartfelt Words

themotivationjournals:

Topic: Education, College, Inspiration, Quotes || via Culture N Lifestyle


As some of you say goodbye to their college years with a teary eye, as well as joy and pride,  we ask you not to fear the future or the unknown. These amazing celebrity commencement speakers who have shared their wisdom and thoughtful words have made the world a little less scary. 



Read the heartfelt thoughts by Helen Mirren, J.K. Rowling, Steve Jobs to Amy Poehler and many more inspiring role models, to remind you that you will be OK!



Helen Mirren Reveals Five Rules For a Happy life:

Helen Mirren delivered the keynote address to graduates at Tulane University’s 2017 Commencement:

“I want to share a few rules that I picked up during my life of disasters and triumphs.  

I call them Helen’s Top 5 rules for a happy life:

Rule Number One (1):

Don’t need to rush to get married.  I married Taylor a lot later in my life and it’s worked out great. And always give your partner the freedom and support to achieve their ambitions.”

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Psychology Fact of the Day

dailypsychologyfacts:

Do you like these facts? Follow @dailypsychologyfacts for more!

 

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How To Start A Blog In 5 Simple Steps

How To Start A Blog In 5 Simple Steps:

HOW TO START A BLOG IN 5 SIMPLE STEPS

Before we get into the details, you should know the most important thing about starting a blog: write because you have a passion for something. If you are starting a blog with the intention of getting rich and famous, you’re probably better off trying something else.

But if you have something to share with the world, whether it’s tips, photos, writing, your interests, or hobbies, I say go for it. I mean, really, what are you waiting for? Here are five simple steps to make it happen!

1. Choose a domain name

 

Coming up with a domain name can be one of the hardest tasks. After all, it’s going to be the identity of your blog. I’m talking about a .com that is all yours. You could go the simple route and use your name, but if you want a little creativity/anonymity, it might take a little bit of thinking over.

It took me a long time to come up with The Blissful Mind, but it ultimately came from my belief that having a healthy mind is the key to overall health. Once you’ve figured out the name, buy a domain name from somewhere like namecheap.com (prices start at just $0.88 per year which is stupidly cheap).

2. Get a host

 

A host is basically the place where all of your blog’s files are located. I use SiteGround as my hosting provider, and I have been so impressed with the level of customer support they offer. The SiteGround team are quick to respond to any issues (which I’ve rarely encountered), and they are extremely knowledgeable about hosting.

 

SiteGround’s hosting starts at $3.95 per month which is perfect for anyone just getting started with blogging.

To start the process, head to this page and click ‘Get Started’ for the plan you want (StartUp is best for your first plan. You can always upgrade later).

 

Once you’re on the next page, enter in the name of the domain you just purchased from NameCheap and then choose which payment plan you want to go with (trial month, 12 months, 2 years, or 3 years).

Sidenote: To be completely transparent, I started off using BlueHost but found that they weren’t as helpful or responsive with questions that I had about my site, so I switched to SiteGround and never looked back.

3. Install WordPress

 

There are quite a few platforms out there like WordPress, Blogger, and Squarespace, but I’ve used WordPress since day one. Since I’m only familiar with WordPress, that’s what I’d recommend you use as the place where you write your blog posts. SiteGround offers a free and easy WordPress installation which makes it a million times easier than doing it manually. Once you’ve set up your account with SiteGround, they will prompt you through the WordPress installation process.

4. Find a theme

 

The Blissful Mind v1

 

The Blissful Mind v2

When it comes to your blog’s appearance, you want it to be user-friendly and aesthetically pleasing. Over the years, I’ve used themes from Angie Makes and Station Seven (both found through Creative Market), and I’m currently using a theme I found Themeforest. If you don’t want to spend money on a theme, there are tons of free ones out there if you just do a quick search on Google for free WordPress themes.

SiteGround has some free templates that they can install for you, and it’s easy to change your theme once you’re all set up. Most places that you buy or find themes from will tell you exactly how to install them in WordPress, so you don’t have to worry about messing it up.

5. Start writing

When you’re just getting ready to start a blog, you’ll read a lot of articles that tell you how important it is to have a niche for your blog. Here’s my advice to you: don’t worry about your niche until you’ve written at least 10 blog posts. My blog started out as a mashup of random topics like an apartment tour, pancake recipes, and beauty products I liked. I had no idea what I was really talking about, but I kept writing because I enjoyed it.

It wasn’t until at least a year into blogging that I started realizing what I really wanted to write about and what resonated with other people. Let yourself write about what you want in the beginning and don’t try to put yourself into a box. These things take time.
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WAYS TO STUDY – How to get disciplined

WAYS TO STUDY – Study tips, Blog , Vlog, Articles, And more…:

    1. My first tip is what I am going to call a ‘daily goals list’. Write down your goals, things you want to change or things you want to do better in your life. Now, this alone is not going to make you do the work you need to do. Write down a plan, some steps you need to follow in order to reach your goal. Make the plan something you can do every day or something you need to do at least a couple of times a week. I for example wrote down that I want to do better in school. My plan to do that is to attend all lectures, revise lecture notes every day, summarize, etc. A list like this is perfect to create a daily planner because you know what you need to do. It has another use that I like even more: at the end of the day, I grab my daily goals list, and check if I did everything I need to do in order to reach my goals. Did I attend the lecture? Check! Did I revise today’s lecture? Check! If I didn’t do something, I need to give account to myself. Why didn’t I do it? How am I going to do better tomorrow? If I didn’t have enough time, I should plan more efficiently. If I felt tired, I have to go to bed a little bit earlier and relax more in order to get my things done.

 

    1. My second tip is to breaks your tasks down into chunks that are so small that you cannot find excuses to not do it. The task will take so little effort that other tasks that you want use to procrastinate on this task will take more effort than this task. (Does this make any sense to you?) By breaking bigger tasks down into smaller tasks, it won’t feel as hard anymore and it will be easier for you to get your work done.

 

    1. My third and last tip is to create a routine in your daily life to beat procrastination. The problem with studying (or exercising or whatever you are procrastinating on) is that it feels like a chore to you because it takes so much effort and you really don’t want to do it. By creating a routine (morning routine, after school routine, weekend routine), you will notice that the things you need to do won’t feel as hard as before because you are used to it. If you are used to studying for 3 hours a day in your weekend, it won’t feel as a chore to you but something you just do every day.

 

    1. Do what you love, love what you do. This is a quote from one of my notebooks and it is so true. If you do what you love, the task won’t feel like a chore to you anymore. It is not work, it is like a hobby. Try to only do things that you love and you won’t mind working hard on it. I for example love law so when I am studying it often doesn’t even feel like studying because I am very passionate about it. If you don’t like what you are doing: fake it until you make it. Pretend like you like it, even if you don’t like it at all. Your attitude towards something can change the way you think about it. To quote the movie Paris, je t’aime: ‘By acting like a man in love, he became a man in love again.’

 

  1. Just do it. This sounds so obvious but this is the one that is the hardest: just do the work. Open your books, grab your pens, and then do it. Stop thinking of excuses, just do your work. Sometimes you have to be hard on yourself. Of course it would be great if there was a video, a quote, a picture, a tip that would make you do the work but in the end it is you who is responsible for your life and for your actions. You can decide to be lazy all day and not do a thing, but you can also get up and face it that you have to work even if you don’t want to/don’t feel like it. You have one life, and you get to decide what you want to do with it.

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Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals

Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals:

Excerpt:

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Choose a specific goal that can be measured. Some examples: lose 20 pounds, write an 80,000 word book, save $10,000, run a total of 100 miles, or meditate 15 minutes a day this month (450 minutes total).
  2. Pick a realistic completion date. This is key. Choosing a date by which you’d like to finish your goal will let you define the pace you’ll need in order to achieve that goal. Make sure your date is attainable and realistic.
  3. **Use Excel or Numbers to design a simple, two-lined chart. One line tracks the pace you’ll need to follow to achieve your goal by the date you’ve specified, and the other line tracks your incremental progress towards the goal. Update this second line every week, or however often you choose. (I’m purposely not posting a template here—I have a good one, but the more involved you are in this process, the more likely you are to keep the chart updated.)

I’ve found it helps to print several of these charts and place them within sight—when writing The Productivity Project, I taped a chart of my incremental word count above the computer monitor in my office, another in the kitchen, and one in my bedroom.

I’ve found this tactic works for a few reasons:

You can make adjustments over time. This includes tweaks to your effort—to either work harder if you’re behind pace, or let up a bit if you’re ahead—as well as adjustments to the goal itself, if you’re finding that in practice, your plan is either overambitious or too conservative. (That said, sometimes conservative goals are the best ones because they feel much more attainable.)

You know when you can treat yourself. Goals are fun to make and achieve, but tracking your progress lets you know when you can let your foot off the gas a little, and treat yourself. It’s a pretty great feeling to both treat yourself, and know that you’re on pace to achieve your larger goal.

**Tracking your progress against a pace keeps you honest with yourself. My negative inner dialogue goes through the roof when working towards larger goals. I have the bad habit of talking myself out of achieving larger goals (especially when food is involved). Tracking your exact progress against a planned pace gives you some cold, hard data to reflect on how well you’re doing.

When you track your progress for your larger personal and work goals—especially against a predetermined pace—you’re more likely to achieve them. I’ve yet to find a better strategy to achieving the bigger goals in my life.

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Studyblr Resources Post

babyjournal:

Heeey guys, so this semester is about to start or it already started for some of you so I decided to make these simple binder organization printables, I will use them to separate each of my subjects and you can find them here with and without the assignment tracker, hope you like them!

Please like/reblog if you use!

For any suggestion or trouble with the link don’t doubt in sending me a message!

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The what – the Pareto principle is productive laziness

80% of outcome is generated by 20% of input

Being busy is not the same as being effective. Being productive means doing things fast. Being effective means choosing the tasks you do well. Your job is to find what is effective.

Take a look at your life. What things bring you the outcome you desire? What activities take up your time but produce no output?

 

Touch it once

One tip from this video I liked, the “Touch it Once” tip. 

If you have a long list of to-dos for a particular day, go down your list and just one on each task for at least 2-3 or even 5 minutes. Before you know it, you’ve gotten into a momentum and you might want to continue with it. But even if you don’t, you’ve at least done 2/3/5 minutes worth of work, and that helps calm your mind a little.